Sunday , October 17 2021

Testicular Cancer is the world's first & # 39; top controller & # 39;



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It is important to go to the doctor to check your bits and bobs, but you may also be uncomfortable.

Testicular cancer is the most common cancer affecting New Zealander men between the ages of 15 and 39 and it is one of the best treatable cancers if detected early and survival rate is 95%.

Despite this, most of the Kiwi men do not regularly control themselves, says Testicular Cancer chief executive of Graeme Woodside in New Zealand.

Men step on the Testism, pull the curtain and lower the trousers. A urologist or GP will pass through a small opening to check the testicles of passengers for irregularities or lumps.

JASON DORDAY / STUFF

Men step on the Testism, pull the curtain and lower the trousers. A urologist or GP will pass through a small opening to check the testicles of passengers for irregularities or lumps.

On Friday, Testicular Cancer New Zealand 'Testimatic & # 39; – will reveal the world's first "automatic ball controller".

READ MORE:
* A week's experience of a Waikato man with testicular cancer
Testicular cancer stimulates men at risk
* Former Highlanders captain Nasi Manu diagnosed with testicular cancer

On November 16-18, men on the Big Boys Toys in Auckland will be able to control their testicles by the device and the registered medical specialist will be kept inside.

    Jackson Thomas prepares to find out what's behind the curtain.

JASON DORDAY / STUFF

Jackson Thomas prepares to find out what's behind the curtain.

Men step on the Testism, pull the curtain and lower the trousers. A urologist or GP will pass through a small opening to check the testicles of passengers for irregularities or lumps.

The whole process takes 30 seconds – without strange eye contact.

In addition to physical checks, the main purpose of the device is to educate men about the importance of self-control every month.

& # 39; Testimatic & # 39; billed as the world's first

JASON DORDAY / STUFF

& # 39; Testimatic & # 39; billed as the world's first "automatic top controller".

According to the latest public Ministry of Health figures, 173 new testicular cancer cases have been recorded in 2015 in New Zealand.

"My test, how fast and easy it is, how important it is and we should check your testicles.

. If you haven't already done this yourself, go through my Testimony and we'll do it for you, Wood Woodside said.

Woodside said it was "half-humorous and a little confronted" – exactly what they were going for.

Woodside said testicular cancer tends to affect young men and can be treated very early when caught early.

Every year, around 120 men in New Zealand are diagnosed with testicular cancer. A maximum of six men will die.

"I think it's a way to get past young people who don't respond to traditional media, like brochures."

They're hoping the groups of men will cross the device and "dare to hide behind the scenes".

"We certainly hope that it will make an impact. It will attract people's attention and take that message there."

Testicular Cancer NZ plans to take many activities and schools around the country, including Big Boys Toys, such as Testic, Fieldays.

"We're always keen on dealing with men in the countryside, because they're often a group that doesn't go to the doctor."

They hope to reach as many New Zealand men as possible to create awareness of the importance of self-control as part of the monthly routine.

CURTAINS – FILLING JOURNALIST JACKSON THOMAS TESTED

To reduce someone's pants to the middle of the ASB demonstration areas, why not be a journalist, typically a Thursday afternoon, but to be aware of testicular cancer.

First impression: The testimatic box looks cold, sinister and looks more like a chemical shower than a legitimate medical test facility.

Auckland urologist Andrew Williams is the faceless man on the other side of the cardboard wall. He sees hundreds of patients for a year and then blindly fold the work, which is exactly what it is.

As the screen is pulled, the anxiety increases and the gloved hands of Williams slowly reappear as they pass through the waist-height hole.

You don't wear the belt – you have to do that part yourself – but then you can move away from your hands and let the professional do your job.

The thought of the whole exercise is actually much worse than the action itself.

After wandering around for more than 20 to 30 seconds, Williams took away the hands and replaced them with an encouraging thumb.

Confirm that you have cancer in 30 seconds. After all, it's not that bad, although there's probably nothing to earn a subscription …

For more information and a guide on how to check your testicles for irregularities and lumps, click here.

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