Thursday , August 5 2021

Motor neuron diseases and supporters walk towards D & # 39; Feet disease



Motor neuron disease diseases and supporters have moved from Palmerston North Fire Station to The Square to support people with the disease.

MURRAY WILSON / STUFF

Motor neuron disease diseases and supporters have moved from Palmerston North Fire Station to The Square to support people with the disease.

A short walk can feel like a marathon for those suffering from motor neuron disease, so people hit the streets to show their support in the streets.

On Sunday, a nation-wide Walk 2 D alar Feet motor neuron disease was held to raise awareness of the day for people with muscular tissue disease, who lost their movement and speech and were ultimately fatal.

Supporters and illnesses of the disease walked from the North Fire Department of Palmerston to The Square and returned to raise awareness and money to conduct research to raise funds for a treatment.

While most were rolling The Square, he was wearing a blue tuft, followed by a fire truck.

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Kylie Martin, 31, from Palmerston North, was diagnosed about 10 years ago and began to deteriorate about five years ago.

He said he ran family – his father, grandfather, uncle, and aunt died of motor neuron disease.

"I'm worried about the next generation," one of her four children said.

She said she wouldn't last long and could get tired easily.

"It's very tiring especially trying to run a house with children."

Marilyn Merriman, 70, from Palmerston North, learned that he had motor neuron disease a year ago.

She needs a walking frame to walk around, but her husband Ross pushes her for a Sunday hike into her wheelchair.

People marched in Palmerston North on Sunday for the Walk 2 D-Feet motor neuron disease.

MURRAY WILSON / STUFF

People marched in Palmerston North on Sunday for the Walk 2 D-Feet motor neuron disease.

An I'm just so breathless, çok said Merriman. "We'd go for long walks for hours, now we can't even do that."

He said it was nice meeting other people who had the same problem.

More than 3000 people in New Zealand have motor neuron disease, and every year more than 100 people die.

Insanlar With the identification of more people every year in New Zealand, we want to achieve these effects and provide the best support for people living with motor neuron disease and their families, için said Carl Sunderland, executive director of Motor Neuron Disease at New Zealand.

Half of the funds emerging across the country went to provide support to people suffering from the disease and the other half went to investigate for a treatment.


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