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Mild activity, walking reduces the risk of hip fracture for postmenopausal women



According to published findings, regular, weekly physical activity, such as walking and working in the garden, can reduce the risk of hip or total fractures among postmenopausal women. JAMA Network On.

“Our study found that mild physical activity and gait are associated with lower risk of hip fracture in older women” Michael J. LaMonte, PhD, MPH, A research professor wrote in epidemiology and environmental health at the University of Buffalo, New York, and colleagues. “This is an important and relatively new finding. To date, there has been insufficient evidence to support the suggestion of milder activities as part of public health guidelines. If other studies confirm our results showing that light intensity activity is associated with refractive benefit, it may be the basis for a future guideline proposal. "

LaMonte et al. Reported that in post-menopausal women between 50 and 79 years of post-menopausal women aged 50 to 79 years (mean age, 63 years; 85.6% white; 8.4% osteoporosis; 3.9% predicted osteoporosis treatment) with) analyzed. ). Women reported physical activity and still time, such as the days of the week and the usual duration of mild, moderate and strenuous recreational physical activity (minutes). The researchers summarized physical activity as energy expenditure, multiplied by the hour of the participant week or the hour of the week, calculated as the product of the metabolic equivalent (MET) density values ​​for each activity. Standard MET values ​​were assigned to light (3 MET), moderate (4.5 MET) and strenuous (7 MET) activity, as well as four walking speeds, heavy duty and garden work. The researchers observed results up to September 2015 and used Cox proportional hazard models to predict HR in the relationship between physical activity and incident fracture.

X-ray of the broken hip 2019.

Regular, weekly physical activity, such as walking and gardening, can reduce the risk of hip or total fractures among postmenopausal women.

Source: Adobe Stock

At a mean follow-up of 14 years, 25,516 women (33.1%) reported at least one fracture.

Compared to inactive women defined as 0 MET hours per week, HRs for total fracture were 0.94 (95% CI, 0.9-0.98 for women with 7.5 to 17.7 MET hours per week), 0.95 for women with less than 7.5 MET hours per week, 0.95 for women exceeding the hour (95% CI, 0.91-0.99) and 0.94 (95% CI, 0.9-0.98). Women with the highest physical activity schedule were 18% less likely to undergo hip fracture than non-active women during follow-up (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.72-0.95). Women were less likely to experience hip fracture during walking at “fairly fast” speeds (HR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.78-0.98) and mild activity (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.73-0.93). ), moderate-severe activity (HR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.96) and garden work (HR = 0.9; 95% CI, 0.82-0.99), compared to inactive women.

Total physical activity more than 17.7 MET hours per week was positively associated with knee fracture; no activity (HR = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.05-1.5), and mild activity was associated with low risk for clinical vertebral fracture (HR = 0.87). 95% CI, 0.78-0.96) and total fractures (HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.87-0.94). Moderate to severe activity was positively associated with wrist or forearm fracture (HR = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03-1.15).

In the analyzes examining non-recreational activity, the researchers found that the total risk of fracture of the study over 6 MET hours per week was low (HR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98) and hip fracture (HR = 0.9; 95%; CI, 0.82-0.99). Compared with garden work.

In the age-adjusted analyzes, immobile time was assessed, daily sitting or lying was associated with a higher risk for hip fracture (HR = 1.11; 95% CI, 1.01-1.21), vertebral fracture (HR = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17), and total fracture (HR = 1.1; 95% CI, 1.07-1.13).

“Current results show that low-intensity activities, including hiking and non-recreational activities, can benefit from the risk of fractures in old age, Araştırma the researchers said. “If approved, future recommendations for fracture prevention in post-menopausal women should encourage mild physical activity, especially in those who are weak and cannot be safely involved in more intensive activities. The fact that individuals as a standalone factor as an independent factor is susceptible to breakage requires further research. "- by Regina Schaffer

Descriptions: The authors stated that they have not made any financial statements.

According to published findings, regular, weekly physical activity, such as walking and working in the garden, can reduce the risk of hip or total fractures among postmenopausal women. JAMA Network On.

“Our study found that mild physical activity and gait are associated with lower risk of hip fracture in older women” Michael J. LaMonte, PhD, MPH, A research professor wrote in epidemiology and environmental health at the University of Buffalo, New York, and colleagues. “This is an important and relatively new finding. To date, there has been insufficient evidence to support the suggestion of milder activities as part of public health guidelines. If other studies confirm our results showing that light intensity activity is associated with refractive benefit, it may be the basis for a future guideline proposal. "

LaMonte et al. Reported that in post-menopausal women between 50 and 79 years of post-menopausal women aged 50 to 79 years (mean age, 63 years; 85.6% white; 8.4% osteoporosis; 3.9% predicted osteoporosis treatment) with) analyzed. ). Women reported physical activity and still time, such as the days of the week and the usual duration of mild, moderate and strenuous recreational physical activity (minutes). The researchers summarized physical activity as energy expenditure, multiplied by the hour of the participant week or the hour of the week, calculated as the product of the metabolic equivalent (MET) density values ​​for each activity. Standard MET values ​​were assigned to light (3 MET), moderate (4.5 MET) and strenuous (7 MET) activity, as well as four walking speeds, heavy duty and garden work. The researchers observed results up to September 2015 and used Cox proportional hazard models to predict HR in the relationship between physical activity and incident fracture.

X-ray of the broken hip 2019.

Regular, weekly physical activity, such as walking and gardening, can reduce the risk of hip or total fractures among postmenopausal women.

Source: Adobe Stock

At a mean follow-up of 14 years, 25,516 women (33.1%) reported at least one fracture.

Compared to inactive women defined as 0 MET hours per week, HRs for total fracture were 0.94 (95% CI, 0.9-0.98 for women with 7.5 to 17.7 MET hours per week), 0.95 for women with less than 7.5 MET hours per week, 0.95 for women exceeding the hour (95% CI, 0.91-0.99) and 0.94 (95% CI, 0.9-0.98). Women with the highest physical activity schedule were 18% less likely to undergo hip fracture than non-active women during follow-up (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.72-0.95). Women were less likely to experience hip fracture during walking at “fairly fast” speeds (HR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.78-0.98) and mild activity (HR = 0.82; 95% CI, 0.73-0.93). ), moderate-severe activity (HR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.96) and garden work (HR = 0.9; 95% CI, 0.82-0.99), compared to inactive women.

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Total physical activity more than 17.7 MET hours per week was positively associated with knee fracture; no activity (HR = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.05-1.5), and mild activity was associated with low risk for clinical vertebral fracture (HR = 0.87). 95% CI, 0.78-0.96) and total fractures (HR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.87-0.94). Moderate to severe activity was positively associated with wrist or forearm fracture (HR = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.03-1.15).

In the analyzes examining non-recreational activity, the researchers found that the total risk of fracture of the study over 6 MET hours per week was low (HR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98) and hip fracture (HR = 0.9; 95%; CI, 0.82-0.99). Compared with garden work.

In the age-adjusted analyzes, immobile time was assessed, daily sitting or lying was associated with a higher risk for hip fracture (HR = 1.11; 95% CI, 1.01-1.21), vertebral fracture (HR = 1.09; 95% CI, 1.01-1.17), and total fracture (HR = 1.1; 95% CI, 1.07-1.13).

“Current results show that low-intensity activities, including hiking and non-recreational activities, can benefit from the risk of fractures in old age, Araştırma the researchers said. “If approved, future recommendations for fracture prevention in post-menopausal women should encourage mild physical activity, especially in those who are weak and cannot be safely involved in more intensive activities. The fact that individuals as a standalone factor as an independent factor is susceptible to breakage requires further research. "- by Regina Schaffer

Descriptions: The authors stated that they have not made any financial statements.


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