Saturday , January 23 2021

Climate change, bird can be fatal to Arctic birds



Climate change may turn the good Arctic neighborhoods into killing areas for baby birds.

Each year, coastal birds migrate to the Arctic breeding grounds for thousands of kilometers from the Arctic. However, this area, which was once a safer zone of birds on earth, has more predators risk than nesting in the tropics, says Vojtüzch Kubelka, an evolutionist ecologist and ornithologist at Charles University in Prague. With the decline of many shorebird populations, nesting success is gaining more importance every year.

Kubelka, who has long been a fan of coastal birds, had heard about regional tests on how the risk of predators changed latitude for bird nests. However, he wanted to go global. Shorebirds is a great group for a large-scale comparison because there is not much variation on how wells look to predators. A wild dog in the United States and a fox in Russia are based on a slight variation of depression on earth.

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Thus, Kubelka and his colleagues drew data from decades of hunter attack rates in the nests of decades of hunter, budgerigar and other shore birds. After a large literature search, the study was reset on the experiences of 237 populations of 111 shorebird species at 149 points on six continents. He says, this is the first attempt in a global comparison with latitude of predator attack rates in shorebird slots over time.

The world-wide historical data of predatory offensive rates were about 43 percent earlier than in 1999, but have since reached 57 percent, the team is on November 9th. Science. The most dramatic upward swoop came from Arctic nest reports. There, the rate of fighter attacks has fallen to about 65 per cent or 70 per cent since 1999, about 40 per cent in the last century. Meanwhile, the tropical dangers in the Northern Hemisphere have changed to araştırma only humble “, with researchers from about 50 percent to 55 percent.

The researchers also examined how much and how much temperatures in each site vary. In general, growing hazards for nests are in line with climate change trends.

Danger zone

Over the past few decades, the Arctic coastal bird population (pink) has been nested in the Arctic coastal bird population, exceeding the average hunter danger in 17 breeding areas in the North Pole coastal zone and in 96 populations in the northern temperate zone. (green).

The annual shorebird nest attacks, 19442016

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Biologists discussed the idea that nest predation usually diminishes when birds move away from tropical regions. One advantage of immigration towards the pole was, in theory, to get rid of the tropical abundance of snakes, rodents, and other egg-lovers.

Tamás Székely, author of conservation biologist at Bath University in England, says that rapid warming in the Arctic may have disturbed some of the old predator-hunter relations. For example, the Arctic foxes received most of their nutrients from lemmings, voles and other small rodents. However, snowfall in the warm winter season snow cover, as well as small rodents are not isolated. He says that in many places the people's cycles of emptiness are now dön mostly busts O. Foxes and other birds of prey can change more birds and puppies.

This scenario of rodent-loving hunters sounds more like a oloj quite likely Kanada bird, but it might be a bit of what is going on, says Dominique Fauteux, an ecologist in the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa, who studies small mammals. He says the Canadian Arctic Region has been paralyzed in Canada.

Instead, some researchers have argued that shore-bird nest failures are generally caused by an explosion of geese that attract more bird predators. In addition, a 2010 study shows that nest predation in the Canadian Arctic is still lower than the temperate areas. It may be a global model, but on the ground, Fauteux says Küresel there are clearly nuances, Küresel he says.


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