Friday , December 3 2021

Discovering new genres in ACT



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Twenty-one scientists of Australia along this part of Bush's Blitz, the largest nature exploration project in Australia, are working in Birriagai.

From the large Tidbinbilla bushes, they are on foot and on foot to bring back samples from the Namadgi National Park, the Australian National Botanical Gardens and even the Houses of Parliament.

ACT government water ecologist Mark Jekabsons examines a recent reptile crayfish.

ACT government water ecologist Mark Jekabsons examines a recent reptile crayfish.Credit:Sitthixay Ditthavong

They even got a helicopter to reach the most remote and inaccessible areas.

Since 2010, at a time of 36, Bush Blitz – a partnership between the federal government, Earthwatch Australia and BHP – discovered more than 1600 new species, including 71 people in the Namadgi National Park five years ago.

Raven, who completed his post-doctoral research in 1984, said that his experience in Canberra and the results he believed did not know how important the surroundings were to the local community.

”I think I'm particularly confused, it's a very close to a city like Canberra, a built city.“

"I know [Canberrans] I don't know how important it is. I know they don't appreciate it, because I didn't appreciate it until a week ago when I came and I saw that beautiful forests were very close to the city. "

He said the taxonomy in Australia and all over the world has been critically inadequate and that resources have been made invaluable during Bush Blitz.

Bush Blitz director Jo Harding said that many people did not see the need to distinguish different species of a particular animal, and that new discoveries often had significant effects.

"If you have something and you don't have a name, you can't do anything with it," said Harding. Said.

"You can't put it in a list, you can't share information about it with other scientists.

"If you don't have a name, you don't know whether it's a new reed frog or cancer treatment, because no one can do the necessary work on it. It's very important."

Scientists aren't the new species they're looking for.

New South Wales University entomologist Ryan Shofner uses a butterfly net to collect samples in Tidbinbilla.

New South Wales University entomologist Ryan Shofner uses a butterfly net to collect samples in Tidbinbilla.Credit:Sitthixay Ditthavong

NSW entomologist Ryan Shofner is an expert on lace insects and is so excited to bring back a known example for some time.

”No one has worked in Australia since the 60's,” he said.

Olabilir There is a lot of unknown, so if it is not a new kind, it may not have been collected for a long time. Both are invaluable to us. Her

The Bush Blitz community will be held from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm at the Australian National Botanical Gardens on Sunday.

Blake Foden is a reporter at the Canberra Times on Sunday. He worked as a journalist in Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom.

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